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Wednesday, June 10

  1. page Process for Selecting Boardmaker edited ... Example: For behavior management cards such as the Picture Communication Symbol (PCS) of "…
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    Example: For behavior management cards such as the Picture Communication Symbol (PCS) of "no hitting" with an international "no" over it.
    "That is not a choice right now":
    Example: If the child hands you a Picture Communication Symbol (PCS) of something that he wants, that is not an option at this time, use a red dry erase marker to place an international "no" on the PCS and say "no_, not now".
    "You are not permitted":
    Example: Placement of a tag board-size international "no" on doors has stopped children from running out of the door.
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    "Brushing teeth"
    Example: Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) representing each sequential step in this task, are placed on a Velcro strip positioned directly above the sink (in front of the child). As the child completes each step of the task, he pulls off the PCS representing the step which he has completed, and puts it in an "all done" envelope.
    · Forewarning:
    Forewarning
    For children who need very explicit forewarning regarding when something is going to "stop/end" or be "all done", use of "go", "almost done" and "stop" cards have proven very effective in giving children this important information to assist them in making this sometimes difficult transition (to stop).
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    "Sit on chair" - PCS of a child sitting in a chair;
    "Shhh, be quiet" - PCS of a face with its finger to lips indicating "Shh";
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    child; etc.
    Example: Going to McDonald's: A photograph of McDonald's is laminated to an index card. On the back of the card, specific "rules" for McDonald's are visually represented.
    Transition rule cards: These cards can be used to help the child understand (visually) where he is going and what is expected of him in this environment.
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    "All Done" Card
    · "All done" cards: Many non-verbal children exhibit challenging behaviors to indicate that they are "all done" with something, as they typically have no other way to communicate this concept. Therefore, teaching a more appropriate way to indicate "all done" through a visual representation system will lessen both the child's and adult's stress and frustration. "All done" cards can be taped to the child's work area and taught to the child by stopping an activity prior to reaching the child's attention/frustration level, then pointing to the "all done" card. The child's hand can be physically prompted to point to the "all done" card if needed. "All done" cards can also be placed on the child's communication board, or book, for him to use.
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    Example: The following topics are illustrated individually on small 3" by 3" laminated cards using both PCS and written words. They are either attached by a metal ring in the corner (for the child to hook on a belt loop) or placed in a small "communication wallet" to be kept in his pocket. The topics include "What did you do over the weekend"? "What is your favorite movie?" "Do you have any pets?" "What books do you like to read?"
    Topic ring/topic wallet: These are designed for children who are verbal, yet have difficulty initiating a topic with others or, have difficulty initiating various topics with others, particularly when these topics are not related to their high interest areas. The "topic wallet/ring" can have various topics visually illustrated (e.g., written words, PCS) to prompt the child to initiate a topic.
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    Example: Library social rules cards: "I will sit at a table with at least one other student". "I will discuss my book with one other student". "I will discuss another student's book".
    Social "rule" cards:These cards are taped to the child's desk in the classroom (e.g., "I will raise my hand and wait for the teacher to call on me"). Social "rule" cards can be made for other environments than just the classroom. A "rule" card per environment can be written on an index card, laminated, and then given to the child to carry along as a visual reminder of the social "rules" for that particular situation.
    att1
    Attending skills:
    The visual symbols "go", "almost done" and "stop" can also be used to increase a child's attending skills. Data will need to be initially obtained to get a general idea of how long a child attends to a particular task.
    (view changes)
    3:12 pm
  2. page Process for Selecting Boardmaker edited ... · Social interaction skills; · Attention skills; · Motivation Motivation skills; · …
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    · Social interaction skills;
    · Attention skills;
    ·
    Motivation
    Motivation skills;
    · Organization skills;
    · Academic skills;
    (view changes)
    2:18 pm
  3. page Process for Selecting Boardmaker edited ... · Social interaction skills; · Attention skills; · Motivation Motivation skills; · …
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    · Social interaction skills;
    · Attention skills;
    · Motivation
    Motivation
    skills;
    · Organization skills;
    · Academic skills;
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    {visual_direction.JPG}
    "Visual Directions"
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    Sequential step directions fordirectionsfor specific tasks/activities
    "School morning directions"
    Example: Upon arrival at school a child is given a "morning directions" card to assist him in completing a visual list of instructions before sitting at his desk and beginning the day. The card is laminated with a dry erase marker attached by a string and is located near the child's coat hook. After hanging up his coat and backpack, he can take the card and begin the "morning directions", checking off each item upon completion (e.g., Put reading book in tub; Put attendance stick in box; Put lunch ticket in hot/cold box; Put "Morning Directions" card away; Sit at desk).
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    9. I can make good choices.
    · Individual rule/behavior cards: These visual representation cards can be kept on a metal ring and used when needed either singly or in succession. Use of the international "no" should be drawn in red on top of the Picture Communication Symbol (PCS) or photo when appropriate to clearly indicate that a specific behavior should not occur. Behavior management cards can also be "color coded". This gives the child additional visual information to better understand desired and undesired behaviors. The following colors are used:
    Red: behaviorsRed:behaviors you don't
    Yellow: behaviors you request the child to demonstrate (e.g., "shhh, quiet", "quiet hands").
    Green: appropriate alternative choices (e.g., "give a hug", "take a walk").
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    {PECS.JPG}
    "PECS"
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    Communication System (PECS): The(PECS):The child approaches
    Numerous adaptations can be made when using a PECS program to meet the individual needs of a child. For example, placing the visual representation system on frozen juice can lids or other hard discs or squares (counter top samples) allows the visual representation system to become more prominent to the child by giving him more tactile input (weight and hardness). He may tend to "crumple" up lightweight paper type items (pictures on plain paper) as a possible sensory need.
    · Break cards: This is to help the child communicate that he needs some "down time" or a "break". Break cards should be easily accessible to the child and could be located in a consistent spot in the classroom, such as on the child's communication board or book, on the child's desk, etc. The purpose of the break card is for the child to communicate the message that he needs a break by using an appropriate communicative mode (visual representation system) rather than having to become increasingly anxious and frustrated, which may result in the occurrence of challenging behaviors.
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    soc1Social Skills:
    Children with autism need to be directly taught various social skills in one-to-one and/or small group settings. Numerous low-tech strategies can be used for this purpose. Social skills training will also be needed to consider the child's possible difficulties in generalizing this information different social situations, which may be supported through the following visual strategies:
    · Social Stories: TheStories:The use of
    The repetitious "reading" of the Social Story, when the child is calm, is what leads to the success of this strategy. Two 3-ring binders of identical Social Stories, kept in page protectors, could be made, one for home and one for school, so the child can read them at his leisure. This strategy has proven to be very successful for many students in learning to recognize, interpret and interact appropriately in different social situations.
    A software program from Slater Software Company (23) which converts text to a graphic symbol, is called "Picture It",. This software program is ideal for adding line drawing graphics above written words to increase the child's understanding of Social Stories.
    · Social Scripts: Social scripts are similar to Social Stories; however, an actual script is developed for a specific social situation (it is specific to the child and the social situation).
    Example: AExample:A child has
    Use of social scripts also readily helps in role playing these various social situations with peers, puppets, etc. Social scripts can also be used to visually, and thus clearly indicate what went "wrong" in a social situation.
    · Comic Strip Conversations: The use of simple drawings to visually clarify the elements of social interactions and emotional relations. Comic Strip Conversations are used to visually "work through" a problem situation and identify solutions (8).
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    ·
    Example: Library social rules cards: "I will sit at a table with at least one other student". "I will discuss my book with one other student". "I will discuss another student's book".
    Social "rule" cards: Thesecards:These cards are
    att1
    Attending skills:
    (view changes)
    2:05 pm
  4. page Description of Boardmaker edited ... The feature that allows the user to vary both the size of the symbol and text is useful for st…
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    The feature that allows the user to vary both the size of the symbol and text is useful for students at different stages of literacy.
    If a student becomes more literate, the size of a symbol can be decreased and words can be added and eventually, the symbol may be removed.
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    and choice makingmaking.
    Boardmaker is one of the most popular AT tools that supports educational strategies to teach oral comprehension to those with expressive and receptive challenges. It is also one of the most commonly used programs in the field of augmentative/alternative communication.
    Boardmaker and Speaking Dynamically Pro Combo is a drawing program combined with a graphics database which also has the ability to talk in human-like voices and play recorded sounds and movies. It also has word prediciton and abbreviation expansion capapilities. These can be used to create 'talking' communication boards.
    (view changes)
    1:46 pm

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